What & Where the Doctors Eat — Dr. Ann Childers

Chris Armstrong Posted By Chris Armstrong on Nov. 2, 2017 / Comments


We all talk a good game about how to eat, what to eat, and the importance of preparing our own food from quality ingredients. The truth is that everyone faces the same dilemmas from time to time. Whether it's travel, working late, business lunches, social outings, or simply not being interested in cooking, there are many reasons that eating that home cooked meal may not always be possible.

I've decided to pose a series of questions to our members on a weekly basis on what gets them through these situations. You might be surprised at some of the answers and others might be exactly what you expected — either way, I'm hopeful that this will help you navigate your way through the myriad of awkward, inconvenient, or simply lazy situations you find yourself in.


This week's interview:

Ann Childers from Portland, Oregon

Ann Childers

Ann Childers, MD

Lake Oswego, OR



CA: Do you put much thought into where you eat out? Or do you simply go anywhere and try to make do with what's on the menu?

AC: I eat at home most of the time because I can't find tastier food anywhere. Still, when on the road I can find something to eat nearly everywhere I go. So long as I'm willing to eat additives and preservatives sometimes and can avoid gluten I experience few limitations. As a Type 2 diabetic I exercise caution around carbohydrates. At fast food restaurants I can usually find delicious lettuce wrap burgers with bacon, and limit sugary sauces. I love barbecue, but limit barbecue sauces high in sugar as well. My craves include the fatty, crispy ends of barbecue brisket, and smoky baby back ribs. A favorite dessert at restaurants is a small bowl of berries swimming in unsweetened heavy cream, or a shot of decaf coffee (in the evening) with heavy cream. For fast food breakfasts I look for scrambled eggs with sausage or bacon. At restaurants I am a big fan of eggs benedict served over pulled pork, sausage and/or bacon, sometimes grilled tomato (instead of muffin), with extra hollandaise on the side, and coffee with heavy cream (no half and half, or milk). I usually eat two meals a day, since meals like this leave me satisfied most of the day.

CA: Most memorable restaurant meal in (or near) Portland?

AC: A restaurant called Beast gave me an astounding array of carnivore delights, including charcuterie, pates, meat entrees.

Urban Farmer is great for roasted marrow bone and steaks. Their grass fed beef rocks completely in terms of flavor and texture.

CA: Most memorable restaurant meal outside of Portland?

AC: I went to an amazing Latino theme restaurant in Scottsdale Arizona. I wish I could remember the place. The tapas were to die for.

Find More Member Recommended Restaurants Near You

CA: For people with special diets, how do you suggest they talk with restaurant staff in order to get what they need?

AC: You are protected by the Americans with Disabilities act. Let the staff know that your needs are medical and they will (usually) do whatever they can to accommodate you.

CA: Do you prepare an emergency meal when you travel? If so, what do you include?

AC: I often take a dozen hard boiled eggs and some beef jerky with me when traveling.

CA: Your favorite quick meal to prepare at home?

AC: Smoked salmon, and a hot beverage with gelatin stirred in.

CA: Do you consume alcohol? Explain why you think it is or isn’t a good idea.

AC: Very occasionally. I consume it sometimes. It is usually one glass per sitting. It doesn't sit well with me so I do not make it a habit.

CA: In terms of food, what is your guilty pleasure?

AC: Raspberries and dark chocolate; deelicious!

More About Ann Childers

Ann ChildersDr. Childers is a child and adult trained psychiatric physician with a special interest in regaining the physical and mental health of children, adolescents and adults through standard psychiatric care integrated with principles of nutrition and sleep.

Dr. Childers published a number of textbook chapters, among them ‘Nutritional Aspects of Psychiatry’ for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: The Essentials (Cheng and Myers, 2011). A local and international lecturer, Dr. Childers’ lectures and podcasts can be viewed and heard on the World Wide Web. A member of the American Psychiatric Association, the American Medical Association, the Nutrition and Metabolism Society, the American Society of Bariatric Physicians, and currently serving on the Membership Committee of the Oregon Psychiatric Physicians Association, Dr. Childers welcomes those who desire an integrated approach to psychiatric care, sleep and metabolism management.

Read More Q&A's from the "What & Where They Eat" Series